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VJ DAY  

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daffni
(@daffni)
Eminent Member

ON AUGUST 15TH I WAS 13 AND TWO WEEKS EXACTLY.

 

Tonight we put out flags

and lit the astonished cricket field

with fairy lights, and filled the air

with patriotic peals of

Land of Hope and Glory,

God Save the King.

 

That anthem that we fled

after flicks on Saturdays,

promoted now to paean,

and we stood in silent praise

upon a playing field,

suddenly become

Valhalla.

 

And then to crackling strains

of dance bands, we pranced

a wild unheeding polka

with schoolfriends, strangers,

neighbours,

anyone to hand.

Exultation reigned

and joy unlimited.

 

And in Japan,

they could not count the dead.

This topic was modified 1 month ago 2 times by daffni
Quote
Posted : 16/08/2020 5:39 pm
luigipagano
(@luigipagano)
Trusted Member

Quite so, Daphne. No one mentioned Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 22/08/2020 9:52 am
stormwolf
(@stormwolf)
Member Moderator

Omg Daff!

I was carried along on such an air of celebration and gaiety, then the last two lines hit me in the guts.... 😦 

there are no winners in war are there? I hope with today's generation waking up to the real evils behind all wars that things might change. War is obscene, period.

Thanks for posting this. 🌺 

I never let good advice interfere with my plans.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 27/08/2020 1:19 pm
franciman
(@franciman)
Noble Member

upon a playing field,

suddenly become

Valhalla.

Daffni, the elemental, primeval feel of this, as set against bacchanalian celebration, is quite disturbing... As so it should be.  I keep coming back to it and each time, the last couplet draws an involuntary gasp.  In my humble opinion, it's what great poetry does, as in this case.

Cheers,

Jim x

 

 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 27/08/2020 1:39 pm
daffni
(@daffni)
Eminent Member

That event took place on our local cricket ground where I used to score for our local team. But that vj night [well, it may have started in daytime. I was only 15 and that is long ago] everyone was out dancing on the green just because the war was actually over and we had not had time I suppose to realise exactly what had happered. For ve day my brother and I were a still in Lancashire and our elderly fostermother took us into southport to see the lights that had been off for the duration. What I most remember of that is the crowds, the lovely horses and carts with all theior brass shining but also panic when some idiots celebrated with fire crackers and the horses broke into panic. But I do remember it meant we could go home.

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Posted : 07/09/2020 4:31 pm
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